BERTRAM & DIANA

All’s Well That Ends Well, Act 4, Scene 2, 1-68
Arden 3 | Suzanne Gossett and Helen Wilcox | London: Bloomsbury, 2018 | 264-269

“They told me your name was Fontybell.”

Scene
Arden 3

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Words and Pronunciation +
Arden 3

Words

They: Who are “they”? (Leung)

Fontybell: The suggestion that Diana originally had another name may be connected to the presence of ‘Violenta’ in the opening direction of 3.5. This interchange calls attention to the name and its association with the Titled goddess of chastity. Snyder suggests that Fontybell, or ‘beautiful fountain’, symbolically contrasts ‘liquid and yielding’ associations with Diana’s cold and stern (8) chastity.(Gossett & Wilcox)

titled: ……..

addition: ……….

fair: ……….

soul: ………………

fine: …………….

frame: ………….

quality: …………….

quick: ……………

maiden: ………………

monument: ……………..

cold: ……………..

stern:  …………..

got: ………………

honest: that is, practising ‘married chastity’ or faithfulness (Gossett & Wilcox)

did but duty: paid the ‘marital debt’ (Gossett & Wilcox)

strive: ……

vows: either the promises he has been making to Diana, or his promise that he had ‘not bedded’ Helen ‘and sworn to make the “not” eternal’ (3.2.21–2) (Gossett & Wilcox)

compelled to:forced to marry (Gossett & Wilcox)

sweet constraint:pleasant force; cf. 3.2.119. (Gossett & Wilcox)

all rights of service: Bertram’s terms are those of courtly love, where the beloved is entitled to rights or rites of undefined service from her lover; Diana makes the meaning concrete, suggesting that this knightly service only lasts until the woman yields and has sex with (‘serves’) the man. Cf. Cressida’s cynical conclusion, ‘Men prize the thing ungained more than it is’ (TC 1.2.280). Cf. 4.5.23–33 and n. (Gossett & Wilcox)

rights: …………..

service: …………

when…bareness: Symbolically, roses are maidenheads, symbols of virginity. The image literalizes the term ‘defloration’: women who have been deflowered are bare, like rosebushes with the flowers removed and only the thorns left. See 1.3.126–7 and n. Touchstone makes the obscene sense clear: ‘He that sweetest rose will find / Must find love’s prick – and Rosalind’ (AYL 3.2.108–9). (Gossett & Wilcox)

roses: …………………

barely: merely, with a pun on being left bare; cf. bareness (20). (Gossett & Wilcox)

thorns: ……………………

prick: ……………..

bareness: ……………..

oaths that makes: Blake, 3.3.2.6 (g), cites this line as an example of the relative pronoun taking ‘a singular verb although the referent is plural’. (Gossett & Wilcox);Diana’s speech is part of the play’s concern with ‘the spiritual perils of oath-breaking’. Bertram’s oaths have ‘no holding’ because ‘An oath that asserts what is true is a nodus, a holding knot … The passage subtly registers, in the wordplay about swearing not, an implication of knot with not’ (Kerrigan, 330). (Gossett & Wilcox)

plain: ……………

single: not only ‘one’ as opposed to many (21) but ‘Simple, honest, sincere … free from duplicity’ (OED adj. 14a) (Gossett & Wilcox)

What…him: As often in later Shakespeare, Jove here represents God. Diana asserts that people (we) only swear by that which they believe in, and asks if Bertram could believe a vow in which she swore by the high’st to love, but then loved ill, that is, badly or sexually in a way that violated her faith. Such a vow could have no holding or consistency (OED holding n. 1c, with this as the only citation), because it would be to swear to work against the very deity she swore by. See p. 20 on possible censorship of the name of God as a result of the anti-profanation laws of 1606. Following Rann’s conjecture, some editors emend F’s ‘Ioues’ to ‘Love’s’ instead of Jove’s, but Love is not the high’st. (Gossett & Wilcox)

Jove: soothing dressing (Shakespeare’s only usage of the word) (Weis);1. A moist, usually heated mass of a substance with a soft, pasty consistency, applied to the skin, usually by means of a bandage or dressing, in order to promote healing, reduce swelling, relieve pain, etc.; a fomentation, a cataplasm. Also figurative. (OED)

attributes: ado, fuss; cf. ‘I am not worth this coil that’s made for me’ (KJ 2.1.165).(Weis); turmoil, disturbance, fuss (SW); 1. Noisy disturbance, ‘row’; ‘tumult, turmoil, bustle, stir, hurry, confusion’ (Johnson).2. Confused noise of inanimate things; clutter, rattle, confused din. 3. Fuss, ado; a ‘business’.  4.a. to keep a coil: to keep up a disturbance; make a fuss, bustle, much ado.

shrift:  confession (Leung, SW); absolution (SW); confessional, place for hearing confession (SW)

hie: hasten, go quickly (also at 72, 77, 78) (Weis); hasten, hurry, speed (SW)

cell: small, humble dwelling (SW)

stays: waits (Leung); stay: stay in hiding, remain hidden (SW); staying, remaining, continued presence (SW); remain, continue, endure (SW); wait (for), await (SW)

wanton blood: Juliet is starting to blush (Weis)

blood: spirit, vigour, mettle (SW); anger, temper, passion (SW); colouring, healthy complexion, blushing (SW); hot blood, the blood as affected by sexual passion (Partridge, 67)

wanton: feminine; or: childlike (SW); lascivious, lewd, obscene (SW); carefree, lighthearted, frolicsome, playful (SW)

climb: to climb a woman’s legs (as though they were the limb of a tree) and then enjoy her (Partridge, 80)

bird’s nest: i.e. Juliet’s bedroom; the idiom ‘to climb a bird’s nest’ may have been proverbial (Dent, N124.1). (Weis) pudend and pubic hair (Partridge, 66)

at any: hasten, go quickly (also at 72, 77, 78) (Weis)

drudge and toil in your delight: ‘I am a mean labourer and hack, and I labour for your pleasure.’ (Weis)

drudge: slave, serf, lackey (SW)

bear the burden: assume responsibility for what will ensue; but also suggesting that Juliet will experience the weight of Romeo’s body during love-making (cf. AC 1.5.22).(Weis); bear: to bear children; to bear, support, a superincumbent man (Partridge, 63)

soon at night: tonight (proverbial; Dent, S639.1) (Weis); quickly, in a short time (SW)

hie to high fortune: Wish me luck. (No Fear Shakespeare Translation)

Pronunciation +

lookest: possibly “look’st” (Leung, also: Arden CWRE, 1998)

shamest: (line 23) Q2–3; sham’st Q4, F; not in Q1 (Weis)

Jesu: (line 29) jeez-yoo or jee-zoo; jayz-yoo or jay-zoo

you: (line 29) The more formal pronoun is used consistently by Nurse when addressing Juliet, while the 13-year-old uses the familiar thou, thee, thy to her servant, in conformity with the etiquette of the day in which social class overrides age. (Weis)

marry: (line 62) mah-ree (UK); meh-ree (US) (OED)

trow: (line 62) tr-ah-oo (UK); tr-oh (US) (OED)

hie: (line 68) hah-ee

wanton: (line 70) want-en or want-in

+prose: (lines 38-45) The nurse switches to prose for this speech.

Translation
No Fear Shakespeare

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Assonance
Arden 3 | 2012

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Alliteration
Arden 3 | 2012

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Consonance
Arden 3 | 2012

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Thoughts
Arden 3 | 2012

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
1. They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
1. No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
1. ————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. 2. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
3. If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
4. When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
1. She then was honest.

BERTRAM
1. ———————-So should you be.

DIANA
1. —————————————No.
2. My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
1. ————————-No more o’that!
2, I prithee do not strive against my vows.
3. I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
1. —————————-Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. 2. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
1. ———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
1. ’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
2. What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. 3. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? 4. This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. 5. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
1. ———————–Change it, change it!
2. Be not so holy-cruel. 3. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. 4. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. 5. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
1. I see that men may rope’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. 2. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
1. I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
1. ——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
1. It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
1. —————Mine honour’s such a ring.
2. My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. 3. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
1. ————————–Here, take my ring.
2. My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
1. When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
b. I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
2. Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
3. My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
4. And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
5. Adieu till then; b. then fail not. 6. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
1. A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
1. For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
2. You may so in the end.

BERTRAM

Long: 0
Medium: 6
Short: 14
Complex: 0

End stopped: 10
Midline: 10

Period: 16
Exclamation: 3
Question: 1
Dash: 0

Total: 20

DIANA

Long: 0
Medium: 11
Short: 14
Complex: 2 | 2, 2

End stopped: 11
Midline: 14

Period: 22
Exclamation: 1
Question: 2
Dash: 0

Total: 25

Rhythm
Arden 3 | 2012

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Pacing
Arden 3 | 2012

Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition. But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!
I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Beats
Arden 3 | 2012

Beat 1


Enter Bertram and the maid called Diana.

Beat 2


BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontybell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
————————-Titled goddess,
And worth it, with addition.

Beat 3


—————————But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If the quick fire of youth light not your mind,          5
You are no maiden but a monument.
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stern,
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.                                10

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
———————-So should you be.

DIANA
—————————————No.
My mother did but duty, such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
————————-No more o’that!

Beat 4


I prithee do not strive against my vows.
I was compelled to her, but I love thee               15
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
—————————–Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you. But when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.                        20

BERTRAM
———————————How have I sworn!

DIANA
’Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vowed true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the high’st to witness. Then pray you tell me,
If I should swear by Jove’s great attributes       25
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love
That I will work against him. Therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unsealed,  30
At least in my opinion.

Beat 5


BERTRAM
———————–Change it, change it!
Be not so holy-cruel. Love is holy,
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,                 35
Who then recovers. Say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men may rope ’s in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves.

Beat 6


—————————–Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear, but have no power        40
To give it from me.

DIANA
——————–Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ’longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose.                                                          45

DIANA
—————Mine honour’s such a ring.
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors,
Which were the greatest obloquy i’th’ world
In me to lose. Thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion honour on my part          50
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
————————–Here, take my ring.
My house, mine honour, yea, my life be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

Beat 7


DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber window;
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.                        55
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquered my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me.
My reasons are most strong, and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be delivered.             60
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.

Beat 8


Adieu till then; then fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.            65

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

[Exit.]

Beat 9


DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.

Pronunciation +

shamest: (line 23) Q2–3; sham’st Q4, F; not in Q1 (Weis)

Jesu: (line 29) jeez-yoo or jee-zoo; jayz-yoo or jay-zoo

you: (line 29) The more formal pronoun is used consistently by Nurse when addressing Juliet, while the 13-year-old uses the familiar thou, thee, thy to her servant, in conformity with the etiquette of the day in which social class overrides age. (Weis)

marry: (line 62) mah-ree (UK); meh-ree (US) (OED)

trow: (line 62) tr-ah-oo (UK); tr-oh (US) (OED)

hie: (line 68) hah-ee

wanton: (line 70) want-en or want-in

Bertram & Diana

They told me that your name was Fontybell. | Text and analysis.

Bertram and Diana | Act 4, Scene 2 | 1-76

They told me that your name was Fontybell.

Source
MIT | shakespeare.mit.edu

SCENE II. Florence. The Widow’s house.

Enter BERTRAM and DIANA

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontibell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
Titled goddess;
And worth it, with addition! But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
You are no maiden, but a monument:
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stem;
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
So should you be.

DIANA
No:
My mother did but duty; such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
No more o’ that;
I prithee, do not strive against my vows:
I was compell’d to her; but I love thee
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you; but when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.

BERTRAM
How have I sworn!

DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High’st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal’d,
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
Change it, change it;
Be not so holy-cruel: love is holy;
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,
Who then recover: say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men make ropes in such a scarre
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear; but have no power
To give it from me.

DIANA
Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ‘longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose.

DIANA
Mine honour’s such a ring:
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose: thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion Honour on my part,
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
Here, take my ring:
My house, mine honour, yea, my life, be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber-window:
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquer’d my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me:
My reasons are most strong; and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be deliver’d:
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu, till then; then, fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

Exit

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.
My mother told me just how he would woo,
As if she sat in ‘s heart; she says all men
Have the like oaths: he had sworn to marry me
When his wife’s dead; therefore I’ll lie with him
When I am buried. Since Frenchmen are so braid,
Marry that will, I live and die a maid:
Only in this disguise I think’t no sin
To cozen him that would unjustly win.

Exit

Source
MIT | shakespeare.mit.edu

SCENE II. Florence. The Widow’s house.

Enter BERTRAM and DIANA

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontibell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
Titled goddess;
And worth it, with addition! But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
You are no maiden, but a monument:
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stem;
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
So should you be.

DIANA
No:
My mother did but duty; such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
No more o’ that;
I prithee, do not strive against my vows:
I was compell’d to her; but I love thee
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you; but when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.

BERTRAM
How have I sworn!

DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High’st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal’d,
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
Change it, change it;
Be not so holy-cruel: love is holy;
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,
Who then recover: say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men make ropes in such a scarre
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear; but have no power
To give it from me.

DIANA
Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ‘longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose.

DIANA
Mine honour’s such a ring:
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose: thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion Honour on my part,
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
Here, take my ring:
My house, mine honour, yea, my life, be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber-window:
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquer’d my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me:
My reasons are most strong; and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be deliver’d:
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu, till then; then, fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

Exit

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.
My mother told me just how he would woo,
As if she sat in ‘s heart; she says all men
Have the like oaths: he had sworn to marry me
When his wife’s dead; therefore I’ll lie with him
When I am buried. Since Frenchmen are so braid,
Marry that will, I live and die a maid:
Only in this disguise I think’t no sin
To cozen him that would unjustly win.

Exit

Thoughts

Short: 9
Medium: 5
Long: 2
Total: 16

End-stopped: 5
Mid-line: 11

Periods: 7
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 7
Unfinished: 1

Beats
MIT | shakespeare.mit.edu

SCENE II. Florence. The Widow’s house.

A1


Enter BERTRAM and DIANA

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontibell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
Titled goddess;
And worth it, with addition!

A2


But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
You are no maiden, but a monument:
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stem;
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
So should you be.

DIANA
No:
My mother did but duty; such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

A3


BERTRAM
No more o’ that;
I prithee, do not strive against my vows:
I was compell’d to her; but I love thee
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you; but when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.

BERTRAM
How have I sworn!

A4


DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High’st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal’d,
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
Change it, change it;
Be not so holy-cruel: love is holy;
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,
Who then recover: say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men make ropes in such a snare
That we’ll forsake ourselves.

A5


Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear; but have no power
To give it from me.

DIANA
Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ‘longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose.

DIANA
Mine honour’s such a ring:
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose: thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion Honour on my part,
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
Here, take my ring:
My house, mine honour, yea, my life, be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.             PAUSE

A6


DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber-window:
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquer’d my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me:
My reasons are most strong; and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be deliver’d:
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu, till then; then, fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

Exit

A7


DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.            PAUSE

A8


My mother told me just how he would woo,
As if she sat in ‘s heart; she says all men
Have the like oaths: he had sworn to marry me
When his wife’s dead; therefore I’ll lie with him
When I am buried. Since Frenchmen are so braid,
Marry that will, I live and die a maid:
Only in this disguise I think’t no sin
To cozen him that would unjustly win.

Exit

Source
MIT | shakespeare.mit.edu

SCENE II. Florence. The Widow’s house.

Enter BERTRAM and DIANA

BERTRAM
They told me that your name was Fontibell.

DIANA
No, my good lord, Diana.

BERTRAM
Titled goddess;
And worth it, with addition! But, fair soul,
In your fine frame hath love no quality?
If quick fire of youth light not your mind,
You are no maiden, but a monument:
When you are dead, you should be such a one
As you are now, for you are cold and stem;
And now you should be as your mother was
When your sweet self was got.

DIANA
She then was honest.

BERTRAM
So should you be.

DIANA
No:
My mother did but duty; such, my lord,
As you owe to your wife.

BERTRAM
No more o’ that;
I prithee, do not strive against my vows:
I was compell’d to her; but I love thee
By love’s own sweet constraint, and will for ever
Do thee all rights of service.

DIANA
Ay, so you serve us
Till we serve you; but when you have our roses,
You barely leave our thorns to prick ourselves
And mock us with our bareness.

BERTRAM
How have I sworn!

DIANA
‘Tis not the many oaths that makes the truth,
But the plain single vow that is vow’d true.
What is not holy, that we swear not by,
But take the High’st to witness: then, pray you, tell me,
If I should swear by God’s great attributes,
I loved you dearly, would you believe my oaths,
When I did love you ill? This has no holding,
To swear by him whom I protest to love,
That I will work against him: therefore your oaths
Are words and poor conditions, but unseal’d,
At least in my opinion.

BERTRAM
Change it, change it;
Be not so holy-cruel: love is holy;
And my integrity ne’er knew the crafts
That you do charge men with. Stand no more off,
But give thyself unto my sick desires,
Who then recover: say thou art mine, and ever
My love as it begins shall so persever.

DIANA
I see that men make ropes in such a scarre
That we’ll forsake ourselves. Give me that ring.

BERTRAM
I’ll lend it thee, my dear; but have no power
To give it from me.

DIANA
Will you not, my lord?

BERTRAM
It is an honour ‘longing to our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose.

DIANA
Mine honour’s such a ring:
My chastity’s the jewel of our house,
Bequeathed down from many ancestors;
Which were the greatest obloquy i’ the world
In me to lose: thus your own proper wisdom
Brings in the champion Honour on my part,
Against your vain assault.

BERTRAM
Here, take my ring:
My house, mine honour, yea, my life, be thine,
And I’ll be bid by thee.

DIANA
When midnight comes, knock at my chamber-window:
I’ll order take my mother shall not hear.
Now will I charge you in the band of truth,
When you have conquer’d my yet maiden bed,
Remain there but an hour, nor speak to me:
My reasons are most strong; and you shall know them
When back again this ring shall be deliver’d:
And on your finger in the night I’ll put
Another ring, that what in time proceeds
May token to the future our past deeds.
Adieu, till then; then, fail not. You have won
A wife of me, though there my hope be done.

BERTRAM
A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

Exit

DIANA
For which live long to thank both heaven and me!
You may so in the end.
My mother told me just how he would woo,
As if she sat in ‘s heart; she says all men
Have the like oaths: he had sworn to marry me
When his wife’s dead; therefore I’ll lie with him
When I am buried. Since Frenchmen are so braid,
Marry that will, I live and die a maid:
Only in this disguise I think’t no sin
To cozen him that would unjustly win.

Exit

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