HELENA
of Athens

Helena’s speeches and analyses.
A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Helena | Act 1, Scene 1 | 226 – 251

How happy some o’er other some may be…

Oxford | 2001

Source
Oxford School | Gill, Roma. Ebbw Vale, Wales: Oxford University Press, 2001

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know.
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity.
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.
Nor hath love’s mind of any judgement taste;
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste;
And therefore is love said to be a child
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys in game themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d everywhere;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine,
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he, tomorrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense;
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither, and back again.

Exit

Thought Counts
Oxford School | 2001

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 4
Medium: 4
Long: 2
Total: 10

End-stopped: 9
Mid-line: 1

Periods: 8
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 1
Unfinished: 0

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience to

Beats
Oxford School | 2001

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!

This is about what she’s just seen, comparing Hermia and Lysander’s situation to hers. The connection is perhaps that there is an unfairness in her situation: they are of equal beauty, according to popular opinion, and yet they are not equal in happiness. Her objective, perhaps, is tied up in trying to find out how to achieve or recapture the happiness they have and that she once had.

Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.

This apparent equality is not matched by reality, due to Demetrius’ mind, and Love’s perverse nature.  She is setting up a problem here.

But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know.

This could be part of the previous or the next. The subject turns here from unfairness, which has detoured a bit to Demetrius willful perversity, to a comparison using a parallel antithetical structure, of their mutual perversity: they both err.  But this is perhaps not a criticism of herself and Demetrius so much as of the situation: Love can’t get it right.  She loves him, he loves someone else.  Both are doing the wrong thing.  It’s another dimension to the problem: He errs, she errs. The erring Demetrius does may not be, in Helena’s mind, erring in not loving her, but in loving someone who already loves someone else, which is the same error as she is making.

And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.


I think the big beat break is here.  She has set out a double problem: there is an unfairness in love, and there is erring going on by both Demetrius and herself, though how seriously she takes her erring as such is a good questions.  But now she begins to work out the problem she’s set out.  Her line of attack is to blame – to focus on – Love, and its nature.  It’s transformative power explains her own erring.

Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity.

She is able to excuse her erring because she loves him. And love is able to effect transformations in how the lover perceives the beloved. She may not think that Demetrius is base and vile, this is only an example that illustrates the extent of love’s power.  If it will transform the basest being in a lover’s mind, it will certainly transform Demetrius’ shortcomings, which include his unfaithfulness, quite easily.

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.

She is explaining here why love is able to transform the beloved so easily: it doesn’t see with eyes, with reason, but with sentiment, which knows no reason. The illustrations of love support the point she’s making?

Perhaps the shift here to judgement is now addressing Demetrius’ erring.  His is a problem of judgement – as set up at the outset: He will not know what all be he do know. 

Nor hath love’s mind of any judgement taste;
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste;
And therefore is love said to be a child
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.

It seems to be taken as a fact that Love’ mind has no judgement.  Why the taste metaphor is used, I’m not sure, although maybe it’s a love metaphor: taste in men, taste in women. . Again, the illustrations are taken as support for her proof, along with a subsequent conclusion based on what may be a common saying about love.  It ends on love being fooled in making choices because of its bad judgement.  There is a suggestion here too, that Demetrius’ throwing over of Helena for Hermia was quite quick and sudden, as it was with Proteus throwing Julia over for Sylvia.  There is also a hint that she might blame Hermia for what happened.

An apparent big jump now with a thought that begins with love’s perjury and ends with its comparison to Demetrius betrayal of her for Hermia. But if we take the previous point as meant to excuse or explain Demetrius’ erring in choosing Hermia over Helena as a bad choice, the jump to Demetrius’ self perjuring and the comparison of that with Love’s habit of perjuring itself, doesn’t seem like a huge one. Demetrius was beguiled into an erring choice, a choice that perjured him, which is not a good thing (here, the transformation of base and vile aspects of a person, in this case Demetrius’ perjury, has another inferred example).

As waggish boys in game themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d everywhere;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine,
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.

A sport or game analogy is used here, which hints at how Demetrius may have rejected her.  When speaking of the example of Love’s perjury from her own life, she uses metaphor and imagery based on water in solid and liquid form. The cessation of his oaths may have been felt as an abandonment of her by Demetrius. Certainly he would have ceased to spend time with her, something that is felt acutely by any jilted lover.  It is therefore not so difficult imagine that Helena is prompted to wave Hermia’s abandonment in Demetrius’ face in a “see how it feels?” kind of way, in the hope that his loneliness and sense of abandonment will make him remember how good he had it with Helena.


Clearly a big break here from working through the problem of Love’s unfairness and their erring ways, to what she’s going to do: give him a taste of his own medicine, perhaps, in the hope that it will cure him.  It’s interesting that there’s no indication here that she will follow him to the woods.  That perhaps is an impulsive decision that she can’t help making, or perhaps its prompted by seeing his reaction and being concerned he may kill Lysander.  But that’s another question for another scene.  Here, she seems to intend to tell him and wait for him to come back licking his wounds.

I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he, tomorrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense;
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither, and back again.

Exit

Thought Counts
Arden | 1979

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 4
Medium: 4
Long: 2
Total: 10

End-stopped: 9
Mid-line: 1

Periods: 8
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 1
Unfinished: 0

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience to

Thoughts
Oxford School | 2001

HELENA
1. How happy some o’er other some can be!
2. Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
3. But what of that? 4. Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know.
5. And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
6. Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity.
7. Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.
8. Nor hath love’s mind of any judgement taste;
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste;
And therefore is Love said to be a child
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
9. As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hailed down oaths that he was only mine,
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
10. I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he, tomorrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence,
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense;
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither, and back again.

Exit

Line Analysis
Oxford School | 2001

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!          10R
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.        10R
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;       10R11
He will not know what all but he do know.                10R mono
And as he errs, doting on Hermia‘s eyes,                 10R11
So I, admiring of his qualities.                                     10R
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,                10
Love can transpose to form and dignity:                     10
Love looks not with the eyes but with the mind,       10 10R
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.           10R | 10
Nor hath love’s mind of any judgement taste;          10R
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste;               10
And therefore is love said to be a child                   10R
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.                   10R
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,    10R
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;                     10
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,            10R
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine,             10R
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,         10R
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.       10R11
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:                       10R 10
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,               10
Pursue her; and for this intelligence,                        10R 10
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense;                       10R 
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,                      10R
To have his sight thither, and back again.            10

Exit

Pacing and Tempo
Oxford School | 2001

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!   pause
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.   pause  carefully
But what of that? <c, quickly> Demetrius thinks not so;  slowly |
He will not know what all but he do know.  pause slowly
And as he errs, <c> doting on Hermia’s eyes,   slowly |
So I, <c> admiring of his qualities.     pause
Things base and vile, <c> holding no quantity,
Love can transpose <c> to form and dignity.  pause
Love looks not with the eyes, <c> but with the mind,   slowly
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind.  pause
Nor hath love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings <c> and no eyes <c> figure unheedy haste.  pause
And therefore is love said to be a child –>
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.    pause
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, <c> ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine,   slowly
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,    slowly?
So he dissolv’d, <c> and showers of oaths did melt.   pause
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night, –>
Pursue her, <c> and for this intelligence –>
If I have thanks, <c> it is a dear expense;    pause
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither, <c> and back again.   pause

Exit

Repeated Sounds
Oxford School | 2001

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Rhetoric
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!    (comparison)
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.       (comparison)
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;       (formidable phraseology)
He will not know what all but he do know;              (antithesis)
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,       (antithesis, imagery)
So I, admiring of his qualities.                  (imagery)
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,            (imagery, antithesis, this and that)
Love can transpose to form and dignity:       (this and that)
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,      (antithesis)
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;        (imagery) 
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.           (imagery, comparison, this and that)
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.           (imagery, comparison)
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,         (simile, comparison, imagery)
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;       (metaphor, imagery)
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,     (imagery)
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.      (imagery, antithesis)
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,         (imagery)
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.   (this and that)

Exit

Before and After
Arden | 1979

HERMIA
And in the wood, where often you and I
Upon faint primrose-beds were wont to lie,
Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet,
There my Lysander and myself shall meet;
And thence from Athens turn away our eyes,
To seek new friends and stranger companies.
Farewell, sweet playfellow: pray thou for us;
And good luck grant thee thy Demetrius!
Keep word, Lysander: we must starve our sight
From lovers’ food till morrow deep midnight.

LYSANDER
I will, my Hermia.

Exit HERMIA

Helena, adieu:
As you on him, Demetrius dote on you!

Exit

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Definitions
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Translation
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Helena | Act 3, Scene 2 | 192-219

Lo, she is one of this confederacy!

Arden Performance | 2017

Source
Arden Performance | Rokinson-Woodall. London: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2017

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia! Most ungrateful maid!
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d,
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sisters’ vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods,
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices and minds,
Had been incorporate. So we grow together,
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition,
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.
So with two seeming bodies, but one heart;
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly;
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Thought Counts
Arden Performance | 2017

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 5
Medium: 7
Long: 1
Total: 13

End-stopped: 10
Mid-line: 3

Periods: 5
Exclamations: 3
Questions: 4
Unfinished: 1

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience:
to show sympathy for her.

Helena needs Hermia:
to demonstrate satisfactory acknowledgement of her hurt

Notes
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia! most ungrateful maid!
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d,
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sisters’ vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices and minds,
Had been incorporate. So we grow together,
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition,
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.
So with two seeming bodies, but one heart;
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly;
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Given Circumstances
Arden Performance | 2017

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 4
Medium: 5
Long: 2
Total: 11

End-stopped: 9
Mid-line: 2

Periods: 5
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 4
Unfinished: 1

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience:
to show sympathy for her.

Helena needs Hermia:
to demonstrate satisfactory acknowledgement of her hurt

Thoughts
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
1. Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
2. Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
3. Injurious Hermia! 4. Most ungrateful maid!
5. Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d,
To bait me with this foul derision?
6. Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sisters’ vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us– 7. O, is all forgot?
8. All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
9. We, Hermia, like two artificial gods,
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices and minds,
Had been incorporate. 10. So we grow together,
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition,
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.
11. So with two seeming bodies, but one heart;
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
12. And will you rent our ancient love asunder
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
13. It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly;
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Line Analysis
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!                                   1011
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three                    10
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.                          10R
Injurious Hermia! Most ungrateful maid!                            10R1112
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d           10R10
To bait me with this foul derisiön?                                       10R
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,                         10R
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent               10R
When we have chid the hasty-footed time                          10R
For parting us–O, is all forgot?                                                 9
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?             10R | 10
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods,                                      1011  stretch
Have with our needles created both one flower,                   11w | 12w
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,                       11w
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,                        10R 10
As if our hands, our sides, voices and minds                      10
Had been incorporate. So we grew together                        11w12
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,                              11w
But yet an union in partitiön,                                                  10R10
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.                          10R10
So, with two seeming bodies but one heart;                        10
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,                                   10
Due but to one, and crownèd with one crest.                      10R | 10
And will you rent our ancient love asunder                          11w
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?                  10R10
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly;                                           10R
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,                         11w
Though I alone do feel the injury.                                         10R

Phrasing and Tempo
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
Lo, <cshe is one of this confederacy!  pause
Now I perceive <c> they have conjoin’d<call three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.  pause      slowly
Injurious Hermia! <cMost ungrateful maid!
Have you conspir’d, <chave you with these contriv’d,  carefully
To bait me with this foul derision?  pause    carefully
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows,<cthe hours that we have spent,  slowly?
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–<c> <pauseO, is all forgot?  pause
All school-days’ friendship,<cchildhood innocence?  pause
We,<cHermia, <c> like two artificial gods,
Have with our needles <ccreated both one flower,
Both on one sampler, <c> sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song,<cboth in one key,  slowly?
As if our hands,<cour sides,<cvoices <cand minds   slowly?
Had been incorporate.<c><quickly>  So we grew together,   carefully
Like to a double cherry,<cseeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön,  slowly
Two lovely berries <cmoulded on one stem.
So with two seeming bodies, <cbut one heart;
Two of the first, <clike coats in heraldry,  carefully
Due but to one <cand crownèd with one crest.  pause    carefully
And will you rent our ancient love asunder
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?  pause
It is not friendly, <c’tis not maidenly;  pause
Our sex, <cas well as I,<cmay chide you for it,  slow
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Alliteration
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
Lo, shee is one of this confederacee!
Now I perseeve they have conjoh-een’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of mee.
Injeree-us Hermee-ah, most ungreh-eeteful meh-eed,
Have you conspah-eer’d, have you with these contraheev’d
To beh-eet mee with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that oow-ee two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the howrs that oow-ee have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles cree-eh-eeted both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Assonance and Rhyme
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia! most ungrateful maid!
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d,
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sisters’ vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices and minds,
Had been incorporate. So we grow together,
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition,
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem.
So with two seeming bodies, but one heart;
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly;
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Consonance and Onomatopoeia
Arden Performance | 2017

HELENA
Lo, shee is one of this confederacee!
Now I perseeve they have conjoh-een’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of mee.
Injeree-us Hermee-ah, most ungreh-eeteful meh-eed,
Have you conspah-eer’d, have you with these contraheev’d
To beh-eet mee with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that oow-ee two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the howrs that oow-ee have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles cree-eh-eeted both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Rhetoric
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?      (imagery, implied metaphor)
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time   (imagery, list)
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?   (imagery)
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods       (simile, imagery)
Have with our needles created both one flower,  (paradox, antithesis)
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,  (imagery)
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,  (imagery)
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds  (simile, comparison, paradox, repetition)
Had been incorporate. So we grew together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,   (simile, imagery)
But yet an union in partitiön;  (paradox)
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;   (metaphor, imagery, repetition)
So with two seeming bodies but one heart, (paradox)
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,  (metaphor, simile, comparison, imagery)
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,     (imagery, anthesis)
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?   (antithesis)
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,  (hyperbole, imagery, personification, antithesis)
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Before and After
Oxford | 2001

LYSANDER
Why should you think that I should woo in scorn?
Scorn and derision never come in tears:
Look, when I vow, I weep; and vows so born,
In their nativity all truth appears.
How can these things in me seem scorn to you,
Bearing the badge of faith, to prove them true?

HELENA
You do advance your cunning more and more.
When truth kills truth, O devilish-holy fray!
These vows are Hermia’s: will you give her o’er?
Weigh oath with oath, and you will nothing weigh:
Your vows to her and me, put in two scales,
Will even weigh, and both as light as tales.

LYSANDER
I had no judgment when to her I swore.

HELENA
Nor none, in my mind, now you give her o’er.

LYSANDER
Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you.

DEMETRIUS
[Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?
Crystal is muddy. O, how ripe in show
Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!
That pure congealed white, high Taurus snow,
Fann’d with the eastern wind, turns to a crow
When thou hold’st up thy hand: O, let me kiss
This princess of pure white, this seal of bliss!

HELENA
O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent
To set against me for your merriment:
If you we re civil and knew courtesy,
You would not do me thus much injury.
Can you not hate me, as I know you do,
But you must join in souls to mock me too?
If you were men, as men you are in show,
You would not use a gentle lady so;
To vow, and swear, and superpraise my parts,
When I am sure you hate me with your hearts.
You both are rivals, and love Hermia;
And now both rivals, to mock Helena:
A trim exploit, a manly enterprise,
To conjure tears up in a poor maid’s eyes
With your derision! none of noble sort
Would so offend a virgin, and extort
A poor soul’s patience, all to make you sport.

LYSANDER
You are unkind, Demetrius; be not so;
For you love Hermia; this you know I know:
And here, with all good will, with all my heart,
In Hermia’s love I yield you up my part;
And yours of Helena to me bequeath,
Whom I do love and will do till my death.

HELENA
Never did mockers waste more idle breath.

DEMETRIUS
Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone.
My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourn’d,
And now to Helen is it home return’d,
There to remain.

LYSANDER
Helen, it is not so.

DEMETRIUS
Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.
Look, where thy love comes; yonder is thy dear.

Re-enter HERMIA

HERMIA
Dark night, that from the eye his function takes,
The ear more quick of apprehension makes;
Wherein it doth impair the seeing sense,
It pays the hearing double recompense.
Thou art not by mine eye, Lysander, found;
Mine ear, I thank it, brought me to thy sound
But why unkindly didst thou leave me so?

LYSANDER
Why should he stay, whom love doth press to go?

HERMIA
What love could press Lysander from my side?

LYSANDER
Lysander’s love, that would not let him bide,
Fair Helena, who more engilds the night
Than all you fiery oes and eyes of light.
Why seek’st thou me? could not this make thee know,
The hate I bear thee made me leave thee so?

HERMIA
You speak not as you think: it cannot be.

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

HERMIA
I am amazed at your passionate words.
I scorn you not: it seems that you scorn me.

HELENA
Have you not set Lysander, as in scorn,
To follow me and praise my eyes and face?
And made your other love, Demetrius,
Who even but now did spurn me with his foot,
To call me goddess, nymph, divine and rare,
Precious, celestial? Wherefore speaks he this
To her he hates? and wherefore doth Lysander
Deny your love, so rich within his soul,
And tender me, forsooth, affection,
But by your setting on, by your consent?
What thought I be not so in grace as you,
So hung upon with love, so fortunate,
But miserable most, to love unloved?
This you should pity rather than despise.

HERMIA
I understand not what you mean by this.

Definition
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Translation
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Helena | Act 1, Scene 1 | 226 – 251

How happy some o’er other some may be…

Arden 2 | 1979

Source
Arden | Harold F. Brooks. London: Methuen & Co. Ltd., 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 3
Medium: 4
Long: 2
Total: 9

End-stopped: 8
Mid-line: 1

Periods: 7
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 1
Unfinished: 0

Thought Counts
Arden | 1979

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience to

Thoughts
Arden | 1979

HELENA
1. How happy some o’er other some can be!
2. Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
3. But what of that? 4. Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
5. Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
6. And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
7. As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
8. I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
9. But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Line Analysis
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!          10R
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.        10R
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;       10R11
He will not know what all but he do know;                10R mono
And as he errs, doting on Hermia‘s eyes,                 10R11
So I, admiring of his qualities.                                     10R
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,                10
Love can transpose to form and dignity:                     10
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,       10 10R
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;           10R | 10
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:          10R
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.               10
And therefore is Love said to be a child,                  10R
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.                   10R
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,    10R
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;                     10
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,            10R
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;             10R
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,         10R
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.       10R11
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:                       10R 10
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,               10
Pursue her; and for this intelligence                           10R
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.                   10R
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,                      10R
To have his sight thither and back again.            10

Exit

Rhetoric
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!    (comparison)
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.       (comparison)
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;       (formidable phraseology)
He will not know what all but he do know;              (antithesis)
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,       (antithesis, imagery)
So I, admiring of his qualities.                  (imagery)
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,            (imagery, antithesis, this and that)
Love can transpose to form and dignity:       (this and that)
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,      (antithesis)
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;        (imagery) 
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.           (imagery, comparison, this and that)
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.           (imagery, comparison)
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,         (simile, comparison, imagery)
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;       (metaphor, imagery)
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,     (imagery)
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.      (imagery, antithesis)
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,         (imagery)
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.   (this and that)

Exit

Before and After
Arden | 1979

HERMIA
And in the wood, where often you and I
Upon faint primrose-beds were wont to lie,
Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet,
There my Lysander and myself shall meet;
And thence from Athens turn away our eyes,
To seek new friends and stranger companies.
Farewell, sweet playfellow: pray thou for us;
And good luck grant thee thy Demetrius!
Keep word, Lysander: we must starve our sight
From lovers’ food till morrow deep midnight.

LYSANDER
I will, my Hermia.

Exit HERMIA

Helena, adieu:
As you on him, Demetrius dote on you!

Exit

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Pacing and Tempo
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!   pause
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.   pause  carefully
But what of that? <c, quickly> Demetrius thinks not so;  slowly |
He will not know what all but he do know;  slowly
And as he errs, <c> doting on Hermia’s eyes,   slowly |
So I, <c> admiring of his qualities.     pause
Things base and vile, <c> holding no quantity,
Love can transpose <c> to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, <c> but with the mind,   slowly
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings <c> and no eyes <c> figure unheedy haste.  pause
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.    pause
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, <c> ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;   slowly
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,    slowly?
So he dissolv’d, <c> and showers of oaths did melt.   pause
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; <c> and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, <c> it is a dear expense.    pause
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither <c> and back again.   pause

Exit

Repeated Sounds
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Rhetoric
Arden | 1979

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!    (comparison)
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.       (comparison)
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;       (formidable phraseology)
He will not know what all but he do know;              (antithesis)
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,       (antithesis, imagery)
So I, admiring of his qualities.                  (imagery)
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,            (imagery, antithesis, this and that)
Love can transpose to form and dignity:       (this and that)
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,      (antithesis)
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;        (imagery) 
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.           (imagery, comparison, this and that)
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.           (imagery, comparison)
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,         (simile, comparison, imagery)
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;       (metaphor, imagery)
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,     (imagery)
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.      (imagery, antithesis)
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,         (imagery)
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.   (this and that)

Exit

Before and After
Arden | 1979

HERMIA
And in the wood, where often you and I
Upon faint primrose-beds were wont to lie,
Emptying our bosoms of their counsel sweet,
There my Lysander and myself shall meet;
And thence from Athens turn away our eyes,
To seek new friends and stranger companies.
Farewell, sweet playfellow: pray thou for us;
And good luck grant thee thy Demetrius!
Keep word, Lysander: we must starve our sight
From lovers’ food till morrow deep midnight.

LYSANDER
I will, my Hermia.

Exit HERMIA

Helena, adieu:
As you on him, Demetrius dote on you!

Exit

HELENA
How happy some o’er other some can be!
Through Athens I am thought as fair as she.
But what of that? Demetrius thinks not so;
He will not know what all but he do know;
And as he errs, doting on Hermia’s eyes,
So I, admiring of his qualities.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity:
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is wing’d Cupid painted blind;
Nor hath Love’s mind of any judgement taste:
Wings and no eyes figure unheedy haste.
And therefore is Love said to be a child,
Because in choice he is so oft beguil’d.
As waggish boys, in game, themselves forswear,
So the boy Love is perjur’d every where;
For, ere Demetrius look’d on Hermia’s eyne,
He hail’d down oaths that he was only mine;
And when this hail some heat from Hermia felt,
So he dissolv’d, and showers of oaths did melt.
I will go tell him of fair Hermia’s flight:
Then to the wood will he to-morrow night,
Pursue her; and for this intelligence
If I have thanks, it is a dear expense.
But herein mean I to enrich my pain,
To have his sight thither and back again.

Exit

Helena | Act 3, Scene 2 | 192-219

Lo, she is one of this confederacy!

Oxford School | 2001

Source
Oxford | Roma Gill. London: Oxford University Press, 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Thought Counts
Oxford | 2001

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 4
Medium: 5
Long: 2
Total: 11

End-stopped: 9
Mid-line: 2

Periods: 5
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 4
Unfinished: 1

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience:
to show sympathy for her.

Helena needs Hermia:
to demonstrate satisfactory acknowledgement of her hurt

Thoughts
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
1. Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
2. Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
3. Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
4. Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us– 5. O, is all forgot?
6. All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
7. We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. 8. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
9. And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
10. It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
11. Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Line Analysis
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!                                   1011
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three                    10
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.                          10R
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,                            10R1112
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d           10R10
To bait me with this foul derisiön?                                       10R
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,                         10R
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent               10R
When we have chid the hasty-footed time                          10R
For parting us–O, is all forgot?                                                 9
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?             10R | 10
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods                                      1011  stretch
Have with our needles created both one flower,                   11w | 12w
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,                       11w
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,                        10R 10
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds                      10
Had been incorporate. So we grew together                        11w12
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,                              11w
But yet an union in partitiön;                                                 10R10
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;                          10R10
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,                        10
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,                                   10
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.                      10R | 10
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,                         11w
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?                  10R10
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.                                           10R
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,                         11w
Though I alone do feel the injury.                                         10R

Phrasing and Tempo
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, <cshe is one of this confederacy!  pause
Now I perceive <c> they have conjoin’d<call three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.  pause      slowly
Injurious Hermia,<cmost ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d,<chave you with these contriv’d  carefully
To bait me with this foul derision?  pause    carefully
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows,<cthe hours that we have spent  slowly?
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–<c> <pauseO, is all forgot?  pause
All school-days’ friendship,<cchildhood innocence?  pause
We,<cHermia, <c> like two artificial gods
Have with our needles <ccreated both one flower,
Both on one sampler, <c> sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song,<cboth in one key,  slowly?
As if our hands,<cour sides,<cvoices,<cand minds   slowly?
Had been incorporate.<c><quickly>  So we grew together   carefully
Like to a double cherry,<cseeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;  slowly
Two lovely berries <cmoulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies <cbut one heart,
Two of the first,<clike coats in heraldry,  carefully
Due but to one <cand crownèd with one crest.  pause    carefully
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?  pause
It is not friendly, <c’tis not maidenly.  pause
Our sex, <cas well as I,<cmay chide you for it,  slow
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Repeated Sounds
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, shee is one of this confederacee!
Now I perseeve they have conjoh-een’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of mee.
Injeree-us Hermee-ah, most ungreh-eeteful meh-eed,
Have you conspah-eer’d, have you with these contraheev’d
To beh-eet mee with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that oow-ee two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the howrs that oow-ee have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles cree-eh-eeted both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Rhetoric
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?      (imagery, implied metaphor)
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time   (imagery, list)
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?   (imagery)
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods       (simile, imagery)
Have with our needles created both one flower,  (paradox, antithesis)
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,  (imagery)
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,  (imagery)
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds  (simile, comparison, paradox, repetition)
Had been incorporate. So we grew together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,   (simile, imagery)
But yet an union in partitiön;  (paradox)
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;   (metaphor, imagery, repetition)
So with two seeming bodies but one heart, (paradox)
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,  (metaphor, simile, comparison, imagery)
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,     (imagery, anthesis)
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?   (antithesis)
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,  (hyperbole, imagery, personification, antithesis)
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Before and After
Oxford | 2001

LYSANDER
Why should you think that I should woo in scorn?
Scorn and derision never come in tears:
Look, when I vow, I weep; and vows so born,
In their nativity all truth appears.
How can these things in me seem scorn to you,
Bearing the badge of faith, to prove them true?

HELENA
You do advance your cunning more and more.
When truth kills truth, O devilish-holy fray!
These vows are Hermia’s: will you give her o’er?
Weigh oath with oath, and you will nothing weigh:
Your vows to her and me, put in two scales,
Will even weigh, and both as light as tales.

LYSANDER
I had no judgment when to her I swore.

HELENA
Nor none, in my mind, now you give her o’er.

LYSANDER
Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you.

DEMETRIUS
[Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?
Crystal is muddy. O, how ripe in show
Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!
That pure congealed white, high Taurus snow,
Fann’d with the eastern wind, turns to a crow
When thou hold’st up thy hand: O, let me kiss
This princess of pure white, this seal of bliss!

HELENA
O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent
To set against me for your merriment:
If you we re civil and knew courtesy,
You would not do me thus much injury.
Can you not hate me, as I know you do,
But you must join in souls to mock me too?
If you were men, as men you are in show,
You would not use a gentle lady so;
To vow, and swear, and superpraise my parts,
When I am sure you hate me with your hearts.
You both are rivals, and love Hermia;
And now both rivals, to mock Helena:
A trim exploit, a manly enterprise,
To conjure tears up in a poor maid’s eyes
With your derision! none of noble sort
Would so offend a virgin, and extort
A poor soul’s patience, all to make you sport.

LYSANDER
You are unkind, Demetrius; be not so;
For you love Hermia; this you know I know:
And here, with all good will, with all my heart,
In Hermia’s love I yield you up my part;
And yours of Helena to me bequeath,
Whom I do love and will do till my death.

HELENA
Never did mockers waste more idle breath.

DEMETRIUS
Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone.
My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourn’d,
And now to Helen is it home return’d,
There to remain.

LYSANDER
Helen, it is not so.

DEMETRIUS
Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.
Look, where thy love comes; yonder is thy dear.

Re-enter HERMIA

HERMIA
Dark night, that from the eye his function takes,
The ear more quick of apprehension makes;
Wherein it doth impair the seeing sense,
It pays the hearing double recompense.
Thou art not by mine eye, Lysander, found;
Mine ear, I thank it, brought me to thy sound
But why unkindly didst thou leave me so?

LYSANDER
Why should he stay, whom love doth press to go?

HERMIA
What love could press Lysander from my side?

LYSANDER
Lysander’s love, that would not let him bide,
Fair Helena, who more engilds the night
Than all you fiery oes and eyes of light.
Why seek’st thou me? could not this make thee know,
The hate I bear thee made me leave thee so?

HERMIA
You speak not as you think: it cannot be.

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

HERMIA
I am amazed at your passionate words.
I scorn you not: it seems that you scorn me.

HELENA
Have you not set Lysander, as in scorn,
To follow me and praise my eyes and face?
And made your other love, Demetrius,
Who even but now did spurn me with his foot,
To call me goddess, nymph, divine and rare,
Precious, celestial? Wherefore speaks he this
To her he hates? and wherefore doth Lysander
Deny your love, so rich within his soul,
And tender me, forsooth, affection,
But by your setting on, by your consent?
What thought I be not so in grace as you,
So hung upon with love, so fortunate,
But miserable most, to love unloved?
This you should pity rather than despise.

HERMIA
I understand not what you mean by this.

Definition
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Translation
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

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