PETRUCHIO

Petruchio’s speeches and analyses.
The Taming of the Shrew

Petruchio | Act 4, Scene 1 | 124-147

Thus have I politicly begun my reign…

Source
Oxford School | Gill, Roma. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus ^ have I politicly ^ begun my reign,             slowly (htsf)
And ’tis my hope ^ to end  ^ successfully.              pause
My falcon now is sharp ^ and passing empty,         slowly
And till she stoop ^ she must not be ^ full-gorged,    slowly (htsf)
For then she never looks upon her lure.                       pause
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come ^ and know her keeper’s call:
That is, ^ to watch her, ^ as we watch these kites             slowly (mono, htsf)
That bate ^ and beat ^ and will not be obedient.               pause
She ate no meat to-day, ^ nor none shall eat.                   slowly (mostly mono)
Last night she slept not, ^ nor to-night she shall not.           slowly (mostly mono), pause
As with the meat, ^ some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, ^ there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, ^ another way the sheets.             pause
Ay, ^ and amid this hurly ^ I intend
That all is done ^ in reverend care of her.                             pause
And in conclusion, ^ she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod ^ I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour ^ keep her still awake.                  pause
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad ^ and headstrong humour.      pause
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ^ ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Thought Counts
Oxford School | 1992

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 2
Medium: 4
Long: 2
Total: 10

End-stopped: 10
Mid-line: 0

Periods: 10
Exclamations: 0
Questions: 0
Unfinished: 0

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience to

Notes
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Given Circumstances
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 3
Medium: 4
Long: 2
Total: 9

End-stopped: 8
Mid-line: 1

Periods: 7
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 1
Unfinished: 0

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience to

Thoughts
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
1. Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
2. My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
3. Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
4. She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
5. Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
6. As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
7. Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
8. And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
9. This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
10. He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Line Analysis
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,                                11    (Thusbegunreign)
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.                                 10R
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,                        11w
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,                   10 | 10R (not, full)
For then she never looks upon her lure.                               10R
Another way I have to man my haggard,                              11w
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:                   10R
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites                     10R
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.                       11w | 12 (obedi’nt)
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.                         10R
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.              11w
As with the meat, some undeservèd fault                             10R | 10 (as)
I’ll find about the making of the bed,                                     10R
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,                        11w
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.                     12   (this)
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend                                               10R | 10 (ay)
That all is done in reverend care of her.                                   10R
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,                           10R | 10 (she, all)
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,                            10R
And with the clamour keep her still awake.                           10R
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,                               11w (this)
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.              11w
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,                          10 (he)
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.                                10R | 10

Exit

Pacing and Tempo
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Alliteration
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Assonance and Rhyme
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Consonance and Onomatopoeia
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Rhetoric
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1992)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Before and After
Oxford School | 1990 (rev. 1990)

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Definitions
Arden | 1979

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Translation
Arden | 1979

PETRUCHIO
Thus have I politicly begun my reign,
And ’tis my hope to end successfully.
My falcon now is sharp and passing empty,
And till she stoop she must not be full-gorged,
For then she never looks upon her lure.
Another way I have to man my haggard,
To make her come and know her keeper’s call:
That is, to watch her, as we watch these kites
That bate and beat and will not be obedient.
She eat no meat to-day, nor none shall eat.
Last night she slept not, nor to-night she shall not.
As with the meat, some undeserved fault
I’ll find about the making of the bed,
And here I’ll fling the pillow, there the bolster,
This way the coverlet, another way the sheets.
Ay, and amid this hurly I intend
That all is done in reverend care of her.
And in conclusion, she shall watch all night,
And if she chance to nod I’ll rail and brawl,
And with the clamour keep her still awake.
This is a way to kill a wife with kindness,
And thus I’ll curb her mad and headstrong humour.
He that knows better how to tame a shrew,
Now let him speak; ’tis charity to show.

Exit

Helena | Act 3, Scene 2 | 192-219

Lo, she is one of this confederacy!

Source
Oxford | Roma Gill. London: Oxford University Press, 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Thought Counts
Oxford | 2001

Thoughts |TBD

Short: 4
Medium: 5
Long: 2
Total: 11

End-stopped: 9
Mid-line: 2

Periods: 5
Exclamations: 1
Questions: 4
Unfinished: 1

Objective

 

Helena needs the audience:
to show sympathy for her.

Helena needs Hermia:
to demonstrate satisfactory acknowledgement of her hurt

Thoughts
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
1. Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
2. Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
3. Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
4. Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us– 5. O, is all forgot?
6. All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
7. We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. 8. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
9. And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
10. It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
11. Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Line Analysis
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!                                   1011
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three                    10
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.                          10R
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,                            10R1112
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d           10R10
To bait me with this foul derisiön?                                       10R
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,                         10R
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent               10R
When we have chid the hasty-footed time                          10R
For parting us–O, is all forgot?                                                 9
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?             10R | 10
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods                                      1011  stretch
Have with our needles created both one flower,                   11w | 12w
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,                       11w
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,                        10R 10
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds                      10
Had been incorporate. So we grew together                        11w12
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,                              11w
But yet an union in partitiön;                                                 10R10
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;                          10R10
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,                        10
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,                                   10
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.                      10R | 10
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,                         11w
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?                  10R10
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.                                           10R
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,                         11w
Though I alone do feel the injury.                                         10R

Phrasing and Tempo
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, <cshe is one of this confederacy!  pause
Now I perceive <c> they have conjoin’d<call three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.  pause      slowly
Injurious Hermia,<cmost ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d,<chave you with these contriv’d  carefully
To bait me with this foul derision?  pause    carefully
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows,<cthe hours that we have spent  slowly?
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–<c> <pauseO, is all forgot?  pause
All school-days’ friendship,<cchildhood innocence?  pause
We,<cHermia, <c> like two artificial gods
Have with our needles <ccreated both one flower,
Both on one sampler, <c> sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song,<cboth in one key,  slowly?
As if our hands,<cour sides,<cvoices,<cand minds   slowly?
Had been incorporate.<c><quickly>  So we grew together   carefully
Like to a double cherry,<cseeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;  slowly
Two lovely berries <cmoulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies <cbut one heart,
Two of the first,<clike coats in heraldry,  carefully
Due but to one <cand crownèd with one crest.  pause    carefully
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?  pause
It is not friendly, <c’tis not maidenly.  pause
Our sex, <cas well as I,<cmay chide you for it,  slow
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Repeated Sounds
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, shee is one of this confederacee!
Now I perseeve they have conjoh-een’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of mee.
Injeree-us Hermee-ah, most ungreh-eeteful meh-eed,
Have you conspah-eer’d, have you with these contraheev’d
To beh-eet mee with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that oow-ee two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the howrs that oow-ee have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles cree-eh-eeted both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Rhetoric
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?      (imagery, implied metaphor)
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time   (imagery, list)
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?   (imagery)
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods       (simile, imagery)
Have with our needles created both one flower,  (paradox, antithesis)
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,  (imagery)
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,  (imagery)
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds  (simile, comparison, paradox, repetition)
Had been incorporate. So we grew together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,   (simile, imagery)
But yet an union in partitiön;  (paradox)
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;   (metaphor, imagery, repetition)
So with two seeming bodies but one heart, (paradox)
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,  (metaphor, simile, comparison, imagery)
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,     (imagery, anthesis)
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?   (antithesis)
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,  (hyperbole, imagery, personification, antithesis)
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Before and After
Oxford | 2001

LYSANDER
Why should you think that I should woo in scorn?
Scorn and derision never come in tears:
Look, when I vow, I weep; and vows so born,
In their nativity all truth appears.
How can these things in me seem scorn to you,
Bearing the badge of faith, to prove them true?

HELENA
You do advance your cunning more and more.
When truth kills truth, O devilish-holy fray!
These vows are Hermia’s: will you give her o’er?
Weigh oath with oath, and you will nothing weigh:
Your vows to her and me, put in two scales,
Will even weigh, and both as light as tales.

LYSANDER
I had no judgment when to her I swore.

HELENA
Nor none, in my mind, now you give her o’er.

LYSANDER
Demetrius loves her, and he loves not you.

DEMETRIUS
[Awaking] O Helena, goddess, nymph, perfect, divine!
To what, my love, shall I compare thine eyne?
Crystal is muddy. O, how ripe in show
Thy lips, those kissing cherries, tempting grow!
That pure congealed white, high Taurus snow,
Fann’d with the eastern wind, turns to a crow
When thou hold’st up thy hand: O, let me kiss
This princess of pure white, this seal of bliss!

HELENA
O spite! O hell! I see you all are bent
To set against me for your merriment:
If you we re civil and knew courtesy,
You would not do me thus much injury.
Can you not hate me, as I know you do,
But you must join in souls to mock me too?
If you were men, as men you are in show,
You would not use a gentle lady so;
To vow, and swear, and superpraise my parts,
When I am sure you hate me with your hearts.
You both are rivals, and love Hermia;
And now both rivals, to mock Helena:
A trim exploit, a manly enterprise,
To conjure tears up in a poor maid’s eyes
With your derision! none of noble sort
Would so offend a virgin, and extort
A poor soul’s patience, all to make you sport.

LYSANDER
You are unkind, Demetrius; be not so;
For you love Hermia; this you know I know:
And here, with all good will, with all my heart,
In Hermia’s love I yield you up my part;
And yours of Helena to me bequeath,
Whom I do love and will do till my death.

HELENA
Never did mockers waste more idle breath.

DEMETRIUS
Lysander, keep thy Hermia; I will none:
If e’er I loved her, all that love is gone.
My heart to her but as guest-wise sojourn’d,
And now to Helen is it home return’d,
There to remain.

LYSANDER
Helen, it is not so.

DEMETRIUS
Disparage not the faith thou dost not know,
Lest, to thy peril, thou aby it dear.
Look, where thy love comes; yonder is thy dear.

Re-enter HERMIA

HERMIA
Dark night, that from the eye his function takes,
The ear more quick of apprehension makes;
Wherein it doth impair the seeing sense,
It pays the hearing double recompense.
Thou art not by mine eye, Lysander, found;
Mine ear, I thank it, brought me to thy sound
But why unkindly didst thou leave me so?

LYSANDER
Why should he stay, whom love doth press to go?

HERMIA
What love could press Lysander from my side?

LYSANDER
Lysander’s love, that would not let him bide,
Fair Helena, who more engilds the night
Than all you fiery oes and eyes of light.
Why seek’st thou me? could not this make thee know,
The hate I bear thee made me leave thee so?

HERMIA
You speak not as you think: it cannot be.

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is it all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partition;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crowned with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

HERMIA
I am amazed at your passionate words.
I scorn you not: it seems that you scorn me.

HELENA
Have you not set Lysander, as in scorn,
To follow me and praise my eyes and face?
And made your other love, Demetrius,
Who even but now did spurn me with his foot,
To call me goddess, nymph, divine and rare,
Precious, celestial? Wherefore speaks he this
To her he hates? and wherefore doth Lysander
Deny your love, so rich within his soul,
And tender me, forsooth, affection,
But by your setting on, by your consent?
What thought I be not so in grace as you,
So hung upon with love, so fortunate,
But miserable most, to love unloved?
This you should pity rather than despise.

HERMIA
I understand not what you mean by this.

Definition
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

Translation
Oxford | 2001

HELENA
Lo, she is one of this confederacy!
Now I perceive they have conjoin’d all three
To fashion this false sport in spite of me.
Injurious Hermia, most ungrateful maid,
Have you conspir’d, have you with these contriv’d
To bait me with this foul derision?
Is all the counsel that we two have shar’d,
The sister’s vows, the hours that we have spent
When we have chid the hasty-footed time
For parting us–O, is all forgot?
All school-days’ friendship, childhood innocence?
We, Hermia, like two artificial gods
Have with our needles created both one flower,
Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion,
Both warbling of one song, both in one key,
As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds
Had been incorporate. So we grow together
Like to a double cherry, seeming parted,
But yet an union in partitiön;
Two lovely berries moulded on one stem;
So with two seeming bodies but one heart,
Two of the first, like coats in heraldry,
Due but to one and crownèd with one crest.
And will you rent our ancient love asunder,
To join with men in scorning your poor friend?
It is not friendly, ’tis not maidenly.
Our sex, as well as I, may chide you for it,
Though I alone do feel the injury.

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